Menu

Call us today for a FREE estimate

866-300-3258

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail

Awards + Certifications

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
  • Angies List Super Service Award 2015
  • 2014 Angies List Super Service Award
  • 2013 Angies List Super Service Award
  • 2011 Angies List Super Service Award
  • HERO Registered Contractor
  • IICRC Certified Firm
  • Indoor Air Quality Association Member
  • BBB Accredited A+ Rating

Recent Clients

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
  • Insulation Removal on US Air Force Reserve Base Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Attic Cleaning at Google offices Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Insulation Removal at Toyota offices Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Attic Cleaning at AAA offices Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Attic Cleaning at State Farm offices Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Insulation Removal at Wells Fargo branch Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Attic Cleaning and Insulation Removal for Caltrans offices Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Insulation Removal at off campus housing Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Bird droppings cleanup in parking deck Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
  • Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation

Recent Work

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
Small Space Attic Cleaning - San Diego
Small Space Attic Cleaning – San Diego
Small Space Attic Cleaning – San Diego
Attic Debris Cleanup - Rancho Santa Fe
Attic Debris Cleanup – Rancho Santa Fe
Attic Debris Cleanup – Rancho Santa Fe
Blown Insulation Removal – Napa
Blown Insulation Removal – Napa
Blown Insulation Removal – Napa

Recent Posts

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation
February 10, 2016 Attic Guys
Blown Insulation vs. Rolled or Batt Insulation

When installing insulation in your home, there are several important decisions to make. These decisions…

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
Read More
September 16, 2015 Attic Guys
The Benefits of a Well-Insulated Attic

Most people know, as homeowners, that they should probably insulate their attic, but what are…

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
Read More
Attic Condensation
May 1, 2014 Logan A
Causes and Solutions For Attic Condensation

Condensation in the attic is a serious problem that must be addressed by homeowners. If…

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
Read More
Blown Insulation Vs Batt Insulation

Blown Insulation vs. Rolled or Batt Insulation

When installing insulation in your home, there are several important decisions to make. These decisions will determine how effective the insulation will be in keeping your home comfortable throughout the year. One of the most important things that you’ll need to do is decide which of the different types of insulation is appropriate. The most common options are blown-in insulation, batts, and rolls. Although professional contractors like Attic Guys will aid you in making this decision, we also feel that it is important for you to understand these insulation types and what makes them different. Whether the insulation is for a commercial building or your home, knowing the differences in blown-in insulation vs. batts and rolled insulation is crucial to determining which best meets your particular needs.

Blanket Fiberglass Batt Insulation

Blankets (Batts)

Blankets are a type of insulation that is most commonly referred to as rolls or batts. This is flexible insulation that is meant for use in areas with standard spacing and relatively easy access. The standard spacing refers to the spacing of joists and wall studs, for which the rolls and batts are made wide enough to match. Batts and rolls may also be used in non-standard spaces; however, they will require cutting to fit properly. They are available in standard, medium, and high density and are made of fiberglass, rock wool, and other mineral or natural fibers. Some blankets come with a vapor barrier in the form of a foil or paper facing. When comparing blown insulation vs. rolled and batts, it is important to note that no special equipment is necessary with blanket-type insulation, but it is often difficult to fit in non-standard or irregularly shaped areas.

Blown-In Cellulose Insulation

Blown-In Insulation

The first difference in blown-in vs. batt insulation is that it is a form of loose-fill insulation as opposed to a flexible blanket. It is sold in bags and made of materials that are of varying degrees of recycled. This includes loose-fill fiberglass, which is made of 30 percent glass, mineral wool, which is 75 percent recycled content, and cellulose, which is made of recycled newspapers. Of these, cellulose has a better R-rating and is not as expensive as fiberglass. When comparing blown insulation vs. rolled and batts, you’ll want to make notice of the fact that it requires the use of a blowing machine. As expert installers of insulation, we are experienced with handling this machine and can install blown-in insulation quickly and efficiently. Because it is blown into a space, it is ideal for spaces that are irregular in shape and size and in areas that have low ceilings or may otherwise be difficult to access or move around in due to obstacles or obstructions.

The Difference in R-Values

When comparing blown-in insulation vs. batts, you must also examine the R-values. While the manufacturer will state the actual R-value of the insulation that you use, according to the Department of Energy, you can expect an R-value range between 2.9 and 3.8 per inch of thickness for standard fiberglass batts and between 3.7 and 4.3 for high-performance fiberglass batts. With blown-in insulation, you can expect an R-value of 2.2 to 2.7 per inch for fiberglass and between 3.2 and 3.8 per inch of cellulose. If you have questions about blown-in vs. batt insulation or about insulation removal and/or installation for your home or building, we’re here to help. Contact us either by filling out our online form or by calling us for a free estimate today!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
Read More
Rodents May Transmit The Hantavirus To Humans

Warning: Rodents May Transmit The Hantavirus To Humans

rodent-02

HPS is deadly respiratory disease that’s transmitted through rodents.

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is a potentially fatal disease that’s transmitted by rats, mice and other rodents. It’s characterized by flu-like symptoms that begin to manifest between 1-5 weeks after infection. Because it’s spread through the feces and urine of infected rodents, homeowners need to take the necessary precaution to exterminate and prevent rodents from accessing their home.

According to the U.S. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HPS has a mortality rate of roughly 38%, making it an incredibly dangerous disease. Some people assume rodent infestations are merely a nuissance, but this disease reveals the potentially life-threatening complications that may arise when sharing a home with rodents. The symptoms of HPS are mild at first and then progress into more serious issues, such as fluid buildup in the lungs.

Symptoms of HPS:

  • Fever
  • Headaches
  • Muscle aches
  • Body aches
  • Dizziness
  • Coughing
  • Chills
  • Lethargy
  • Tightness in chest
  • Trouble breathing
  • Fluid buildup in chest

What Causes The Hantivirus?

The hantavirus is transmitted to humans through the feces and urine of infected rodents. When a person touches the urine or feces of an infected rodent — and then touches their face or mouth — they may catch the disease. In addition, HPS is also transmitted through the air, meaning a person catch the disease simply by breathing in the air around an infected rodent’s urine or feces. The CDC  states the following on their website:

“Rodent infestation in and around the home remains the primary risk for hantavirus exposure. Even healthy individuals are at risk for HPS infection if exposed to the virus.

Is HPS Transmittable Between Humans?

To date, there have been no known cases of HPS being transmitted from one person to another. A study was recently performed to determine whether or not HPS was transmittable between humans. During the study, researchers analyzed the data of healthcare workers who were given the task of caring for people with HPS. Researchers noted that none of the healthcare workers had caught the disease, leaving them to believe that it is not transmittable between humans.

Unfortunately, there’s no cure for HPS, as doctors can only treat the symptoms caused by the disease.

How To Protect Yourself and Your Family Against HPS

Being that the disease is transmitted through rodents, the most important precaution you can take to protect yourself, and your family, against HPS is to keep rodents out of your home. If you’re struggling with a rodent infestation in your home, contact the Attic Guys today for a FREE house inspection.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
Read More

How To Get Rid of Dead Mouse Odors

question-trade-world-11479-lThe stench of a dead and decaying mouse inside the home is enough to drive anyone crazy. It’s hard to fully enjoy your home when you’re forced to smell this undeniably foul odor each time you take a breath. And to make matters worse, it can several weeks for the smell to fully go away if you simply try to “wait it out.”

Before you go packing your luggage and heading out to the nearest hotel, there are a couple of things you can do to eliminate the bad odors.

Avoid Air Fresheners

First and foremost, do not attempt to mask the odor using an air freshener. Nine out of ten times this will only make the smell worse by mixing it with other chemicals. Air fresheners work by adding fragrant chemicals to the air, and using them when there’s a dead mouse around will create an even stronger stench that lingers in your home.

Use White Vinegar

Placing a small bowl of white vinegar in the room where the odor is most severe may help eliminate some of the stench. Vinegar has its own sour odor, but it’s also a highly effective disinfectant that kills odor-causing germs and bacteria. Allowing the bowl to sit uncovered encourages the vinegar to evaporate; thus, killing some of the odor-causing germs.

You really have two different options when it comes to dead mouse odors: you can attempt to find and remove the dead mouse, or you can wait for it to naturally decay. Most normal-sized mice should decay in 1-2 weeks time; however, larger mice and rats may take longer. If the smell is simply too much for you and your family to bear, it’s recommended that you find and remove the corpse rather than waiting for it to decay.

Locating The Dead Mouse

Try to locate the origin of the dead mouse by walking throughout your home and smelling the air. It’s not a pleasant or enjoyable task by any means, but the odor will be stronger around the mouse. Check in rooms, crawlspaces, basements, attics, garages, storage sheds any anywhere else you can easily access, paying close attention to the odor levels.

In the event that you can’t find or access the dead mouse (it’s not uncommon for mice to die behind walls), you can always contact the Attic Guys for a fast and friendly professional rodent removal service.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmail
Read More